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Author: Administrator

03/02/2009



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Pacino plays depressed men – twice – at Venice film fest

Al Pacino fended off suggestions on Saturday that because he plays depressed characters in two movies shown at the Venice Film Festival he must have a special affinity for such roles. The "Godfather" star, who is 74, also said that while he did not consider himself to be a Hollywood actor, he appreciated some of the big budget films coming out of there. "I just saw the 'Guardians of the Galaxy', a Marvel thing, it was amazing," he said at news conferences after his two films were shown. In Barry Levinson's "The Humbling", based on a Philip Roth novel, Pacino plays an ageing Shakespearean actor who has lost his ability to act. In director David Gordon Green's "Manglehorn" he is a Texas locksmith who has never gotten over the love of his life, whom he abandoned, and locked himself away from normal human contact. Since the characters he plays are anti-social and prickly, Pacino was peppered with questions about whether he draws on personal experience to play people who suffer from depression. "I don't see how I could not be depressed some of the time but I don't know about it," he said. "How does it go? You say 'I'm depressed' but life is sort of all over us. I mean, things make you sad...basically you'd like to be a bit happier sometime but depressed seems so ominous and it's really in all of us," Pacino said.

Jennifer Aniston on being a ‘badass’ after ‘Friends’

After playing sitcom sweetheart Rachel Green in long-running television comedy "Friends" for 10 years, Jennifer Aniston has spent the last decade looking for roles where she can "kick some ass." In "Life of Crime," out in U.S. theatres on Friday, Aniston taps into a 1970s Detroit trophy wife and socialite, Mickey Dawson, who finds herself held for ransom while her cheating husband debates whether to pay for her release. Aniston, 45, talked to about the excitement of being in a caper comedy, playing strong female characters and the "Friends" phenomenon 10 years after it concluded its run.

Director Martin Scorsese in early stages of Ramones movie project

Veteran filmmaker Martin Scorsese will be tapping into rock history with his next project, a movie on punk rockers the Ramones, his spokeswoman said on Friday. Scorsese, 71, who won a best director Oscar in 2007 for "The Departed," is in "way way early stages" of the project, his representative Michelle Margolis said. While Scorsese is best known for directing critically lauded films such as mob drama "Goodfellas" and most recently the acerbic comedy "The Wolf of Wall Street", he has also delved into music documentaries such as 2008's "Shine a Light", exploring the journey of The Rolling Stones. Founded in New York in 1974, the Ramones - formed by Johnny Ramone, Joey Ramone, Dee Dee Ramone and Tommy Ramone - spearheaded the punk-rock movement with aggressive, fast-driving songs such as "Blitzkrieg Bop," "I Wanna Be Sedated" and "Sheena is a Punk Rocker." Drummer Tommy Ramone, who was the last surviving original member of the band, died aged 65 in July this year.

California passes plastic bag ban, would be first such law in U.S

The California state legislature enacted a ban on plastic grocery bags on Friday near the end of its two-year session, a measure that if signed into law would become the first of its kind in America. A number of cities and counties in California and other U.S. states, including Hawaii's Maui County, have made it illegal for grocery stores to pack purchases in plastic. But at the state level, opposition from plastic bag makers has usually prevailed. The California Senate voted 22-15 for the bill, which must be signed into law by Sept. 30 by Democratic Governor Jerry Brown, who has not signaled a position on the measure. "Single-use plastic bags not only litter our beaches, but also our mountains, our deserts, and our rivers, streams and lakes," said state Senator Alex Padilla, who sponsored the bill. Padilla backed a similar measure last year but it failed by three votes. The fate of this bill was uncertain until the waning hours of the session after falling three votes short in the state's Assembly on Monday. But after picking up the support of the United Food and Commercial Workers Union, the bill passed a second vote in the Assembly. The measure would ban grocery stores from handing out single-use grocery bags with customers' purchases, and provide money to local plastic bag companies to retool to make heavier, multiple-use bags that customers could buy. Environmentalists have pushed for banning plastic bags, which are cheaper for supermarkets to use than paper bags, but create mountains of trash that is difficult to recycle. In California, there is particular concern that the bags, when swept out to sea, could harm ocean life. After the defeat of his earlier bill, Padilla won the support of some California-based bag makers by including the funding for retooling. But in recent months, out-of-state manufacturers campaigned against the bill, even producing television advertisements targeting Padilla, who is running for secretary of state. Cathy Browne, general manager at Crown Poly, a plastic bag manufacturer in Huntington Park, California, said the bill would lead to layoffs at companies like hers. More than 10 billion plastic bags are used in California each year, according to an estimate by Californians Against Waste, an advocacy group supporting the bill.

Miley Cyrus’ MTV awards date turns himself in on probation violation

A homeless man who was chosen by Miley Cyrus to accept her MTV Music Video Award on Sunday has turned himself in on a probation violation and was free after posting bail, authorities in Oregon said on Friday. Jesse Helt, 22, made headlines at Sunday's VMAs show when Cyrus opted not to collect the video of the year award for her hit "Wrecking Ball," sending Helt in her place as a way to draw attention to youth homelessness. Helt had a warrant for his arrest on a probation violation for criminal trespass since November 2011 after he failed to report and comply with probation supervision, Polk County Director of Community Corrections Martin Silbernagel said. Helt's probation officer said this week that local authorities had been looking for Helt in Salem, Oregon, after his mother told the Oregonian newspaper that Cyrus had given Helt money to fly home. Helt turned himself in on Thursday evening and was released about 90 minutes later after posting the state-required 10 percent of his $25,000 bail, a spokeswoman for the Polk County Sheriff's Office said.